Teachers' strike: Chippenham and Corsham secondary schools to be affected

Abbeyfield, Hardenhuish and Sheldon schools will be affected by NUT strike action on Wednesday

Abbeyfield, Hardenhuish and Sheldon schools will be affected by NUT strike action on Wednesday

First published in News

All of Chippenham’s secondary schools will be affected by NUT strike action on Wednesday.

Abbeyfield, Hardenhuish and Sheldon schools will all be partially open for students in years 11, 12 and 13, but will be closed to students in other year groups.

At Sheldon, where just over one third of teaching staff - 43 teachers - are members of the NUT, the year 12 UCAS fair and psychology trip will go ahead as planned but the year 8 parents’ evening is postponed.

Space will be provided for year 7 pupils across Chippenham to work under supervision.

Parents wanting to take up this offer should email contact@abbeyfield.wilts.sch.uk or admin@hardenhuish.wilts.sch.uk or admin@sheldonschool.co.uk with their child’s name.

The Corsham School will be closed to pupils, although the sixth form will remain open.

 

Comments (18)

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9:58pm Tue 25 Mar 14

glm737 says...

Yet another strike for selfish teachers to inflict on parents and pupils. A really good example they set by throwing their toys out of their prams when they don't get what they desire.

Don't give me claptrap about working long hours, do teachers think they have a monopoly on working long hours. At least they can have their 6 week break in the summer to recover. Don't like teaching get out into the corporate world and get your eyes opened up to the real world.

Care about teaching and the pupils, do me a favour and tell it for what it is...MONEY.
Yet another strike for selfish teachers to inflict on parents and pupils. A really good example they set by throwing their toys out of their prams when they don't get what they desire. Don't give me claptrap about working long hours, do teachers think they have a monopoly on working long hours. At least they can have their 6 week break in the summer to recover. Don't like teaching get out into the corporate world and get your eyes opened up to the real world. Care about teaching and the pupils, do me a favour and tell it for what it is...MONEY. glm737
  • Score: -2

2:42pm Wed 26 Mar 14

kimcrawley says...

Most teachers do not have a 6 week break in the summer.
Unfortunately for glm737 it's not against the law to take industrial action even if you are a teacher.
It probably is about money - how much Gove is going to swindle teachers by when they 'improve' their terms and conditions.
We should support the teachers, once again the only course of action left to them was industrial action. Blame Gove and his department for trying to bulldoze huge changes to pay and pensions by using PBR schemes. Quite how they will set the benchmarks and judge results has yet to be explained. Gove has provoked this not the teachers.
Most teachers do not have a 6 week break in the summer. Unfortunately for glm737 it's not against the law to take industrial action even if you are a teacher. It probably is about money - how much Gove is going to swindle teachers by when they 'improve' their terms and conditions. We should support the teachers, once again the only course of action left to them was industrial action. Blame Gove and his department for trying to bulldoze huge changes to pay and pensions by using PBR schemes. Quite how they will set the benchmarks and judge results has yet to be explained. Gove has provoked this not the teachers. kimcrawley
  • Score: 0

4:05pm Wed 26 Mar 14

glm737 says...

Don't like it get a job in the real world. I stand by the comments 100%, it's all about money. Teachers(?) don't give a **** about pupils and resort to the outdated 70's scenario of striking so that they can line their own pockets.
Don't like it get a job in the real world. I stand by the comments 100%, it's all about money. Teachers(?) don't give a **** about pupils and resort to the outdated 70's scenario of striking so that they can line their own pockets. glm737
  • Score: 0

8:03pm Wed 26 Mar 14

moonraker77 says...

glm737 wrote:
Don't like it get a job in the real world. I stand by the comments 100%, it's all about money. Teachers(?) don't give a **** about pupils and resort to the outdated 70's scenario of striking so that they can line their own pockets.
Don't you just love it when there's someone who can't see both sides of a discussion and has to resort to senseless clichés and bad language. Also note that you have time to spare during the working day to vent your frustrations online. Your job if you have one, might bore me.
[quote][p][bold]glm737[/bold] wrote: Don't like it get a job in the real world. I stand by the comments 100%, it's all about money. Teachers(?) don't give a **** about pupils and resort to the outdated 70's scenario of striking so that they can line their own pockets.[/p][/quote]Don't you just love it when there's someone who can't see both sides of a discussion and has to resort to senseless clichés and bad language. Also note that you have time to spare during the working day to vent your frustrations online. Your job if you have one, might bore me. moonraker77
  • Score: 8

9:32pm Wed 26 Mar 14

beetawix says...

glm37' don't like it get a job.....etc. do you mean "if you don't like it get a job...etc

Anyone who thinks that anyone who would prepare lessons and control a classful of children on a daily basis as a method of "lining pockets" then they are probably a complete oaf
glm37' don't like it get a job.....etc. do you mean "if you don't like it get a job...etc Anyone who thinks that anyone who would prepare lessons and control a classful of children on a daily basis as a method of "lining pockets" then they are probably a complete oaf beetawix
  • Score: 6

12:20pm Thu 27 Mar 14

kimcrawley says...

glm37
just another nasty tory who does not live in the real world. No doubt glm37 will think firemen are overpaid until the house catches fire. We are back in 'Daily Mail' land where teaching isn't a proper job but selling dodgy products and manipulating markets is.
glm37 just another nasty tory who does not live in the real world. No doubt glm37 will think firemen are overpaid until the house catches fire. We are back in 'Daily Mail' land where teaching isn't a proper job but selling dodgy products and manipulating markets is. kimcrawley
  • Score: 6

2:53pm Thu 27 Mar 14

allthedecentnameshavegone says...

When my child started school I had an open mind about the teaching profession. Having met the five teachers that my child has had so far, and their headteacher, I have to say that they're a deeply disappointing bunch.

It is obvious that none of them have any experience outside education, having gone from school, to university and back to school again and only one of them would have a chance of holding down a job in the private sector.

They are scruffy, cannot start or end the school day on time and their newsletters and homework tasks are full of spelling errors and indecipherable school jargon - what sort of example is this to set our children?

If they want better pay and conditions they should earn them, not hold the nation to ransom for them.
When my child started school I had an open mind about the teaching profession. Having met the five teachers that my child has had so far, and their headteacher, I have to say that they're a deeply disappointing bunch. It is obvious that none of them have any experience outside education, having gone from school, to university and back to school again and only one of them would have a chance of holding down a job in the private sector. They are scruffy, cannot start or end the school day on time and their newsletters and homework tasks are full of spelling errors and indecipherable school jargon - what sort of example is this to set our children? If they want better pay and conditions they should earn them, not hold the nation to ransom for them. allthedecentnameshavegone
  • Score: 4

5:39pm Thu 27 Mar 14

kimcrawley says...

allthedecent .....
Is there any link to the fact that most of these teachers would have been educated under a system introduced by the tories. Teachers have been saying for years that education was more than just tests.
As for holding the nation to ransom that is exactly what the tory bankers have done to the tune of hundreds of billions, but that's alright they are in the private sector. Proper tory jobs lying, thieving and incompetent, if they were so clever why did they carry on ruining the economy. Perhaps they should learn something from the public sector that they, like you deride.
We own the banks, public money bailed them out. When are these thieves going to pay us back, we are constantly told we have to pay ridiculous bonuses or they will leave. Let them go they are responsible for the recession not teachers or welfare claimants just the useless tory bankers.
allthedecent ..... Is there any link to the fact that most of these teachers would have been educated under a system introduced by the tories. Teachers have been saying for years that education was more than just tests. As for holding the nation to ransom that is exactly what the tory bankers have done to the tune of hundreds of billions, but that's alright they are in the private sector. Proper tory jobs lying, thieving and incompetent, if they were so clever why did they carry on ruining the economy. Perhaps they should learn something from the public sector that they, like you deride. We own the banks, public money bailed them out. When are these thieves going to pay us back, we are constantly told we have to pay ridiculous bonuses or they will leave. Let them go they are responsible for the recession not teachers or welfare claimants just the useless tory bankers. kimcrawley
  • Score: 3

5:42pm Thu 27 Mar 14

politepanda says...

glm737 wrote:
Yet another strike for selfish teachers to inflict on parents and pupils. A really good example they set by throwing their toys out of their prams when they don't get what they desire.

Don't give me claptrap about working long hours, do teachers think they have a monopoly on working long hours. At least they can have their 6 week break in the summer to recover. Don't like teaching get out into the corporate world and get your eyes opened up to the real world.

Care about teaching and the pupils, do me a favour and tell it for what it is...MONEY.
6 week break in the summer?? Obviously no idea what you're talking about - but don't let that stop your nasty little rants.
Most teachers care about their jobs - and the pupils.
But why on earth shouldn't they care about their wages and pensions, too??
Don't you?
[quote][p][bold]glm737[/bold] wrote: Yet another strike for selfish teachers to inflict on parents and pupils. A really good example they set by throwing their toys out of their prams when they don't get what they desire. Don't give me claptrap about working long hours, do teachers think they have a monopoly on working long hours. At least they can have their 6 week break in the summer to recover. Don't like teaching get out into the corporate world and get your eyes opened up to the real world. Care about teaching and the pupils, do me a favour and tell it for what it is...MONEY.[/p][/quote]6 week break in the summer?? Obviously no idea what you're talking about - but don't let that stop your nasty little rants. Most teachers care about their jobs - and the pupils. But why on earth shouldn't they care about their wages and pensions, too?? Don't you? politepanda
  • Score: 8

7:06pm Thu 27 Mar 14

allthedecentnameshavegone says...

kimcrawley wrote:
allthedecent .....
Is there any link to the fact that most of these teachers would have been educated under a system introduced by the tories. Teachers have been saying for years that education was more than just tests.
As for holding the nation to ransom that is exactly what the tory bankers have done to the tune of hundreds of billions, but that's alright they are in the private sector. Proper tory jobs lying, thieving and incompetent, if they were so clever why did they carry on ruining the economy. Perhaps they should learn something from the public sector that they, like you deride.
We own the banks, public money bailed them out. When are these thieves going to pay us back, we are constantly told we have to pay ridiculous bonuses or they will leave. Let them go they are responsible for the recession not teachers or welfare claimants just the useless tory bankers.
Kim, I too was educated during the tory years and vividly remember the many extra days I had off when my teachers were striking, the larger than desirable class sizes and having to share each text book with at least two other pupils. My education was not as good as I, with hindsight, would have liked and it certainly wasn't as good as my parents received.

I agree that an obsessive focus on tests is not guaranteed to provide the best motivation for teachers (although there is a saying that you cannot improve what you don't measure) and I accept that the national curriculum probably deprives many teachers of the creativity that they wouldlike to be able to bring to their jobs.

I also agree that the private sector is far from perfect, and that banking in particular is a failed system.

I also agree, as politepanda says, that many teachers care deeply about their jobs and their pupils.

But what I do genuinely believe though, is that by having been sheltered within the education system for most of their lives, firstly as students and latterly as teachers, that most teachers have not been exposed to many of the employment and other pressures and experiences that would make them better teachers.

During my education I was lucky enough to have had four truly outstanding teachers to whom I owe a lot - three had previously been police officers and the fourth had worked in private industry. They were head and shoulders above their colleagues in almost every respect and were beacons of excellence in a fog of mediocrity.

My point is that my child's teachers are all 'career teachers' who have done nothing else, and that my child is paying the price for their lack of worldliness, and that its not a price that our children should have to pay, and it's not something we should reward the teaching profession for.
[quote][p][bold]kimcrawley[/bold] wrote: allthedecent ..... Is there any link to the fact that most of these teachers would have been educated under a system introduced by the tories. Teachers have been saying for years that education was more than just tests. As for holding the nation to ransom that is exactly what the tory bankers have done to the tune of hundreds of billions, but that's alright they are in the private sector. Proper tory jobs lying, thieving and incompetent, if they were so clever why did they carry on ruining the economy. Perhaps they should learn something from the public sector that they, like you deride. We own the banks, public money bailed them out. When are these thieves going to pay us back, we are constantly told we have to pay ridiculous bonuses or they will leave. Let them go they are responsible for the recession not teachers or welfare claimants just the useless tory bankers.[/p][/quote]Kim, I too was educated during the tory years and vividly remember the many extra days I had off when my teachers were striking, the larger than desirable class sizes and having to share each text book with at least two other pupils. My education was not as good as I, with hindsight, would have liked and it certainly wasn't as good as my parents received. I agree that an obsessive focus on tests is not guaranteed to provide the best motivation for teachers (although there is a saying that you cannot improve what you don't measure) and I accept that the national curriculum probably deprives many teachers of the creativity that they wouldlike to be able to bring to their jobs. I also agree that the private sector is far from perfect, and that banking in particular is a failed system. I also agree, as politepanda says, that many teachers care deeply about their jobs and their pupils. But what I do genuinely believe though, is that by having been sheltered within the education system for most of their lives, firstly as students and latterly as teachers, that most teachers have not been exposed to many of the employment and other pressures and experiences that would make them better teachers. During my education I was lucky enough to have had four truly outstanding teachers to whom I owe a lot - three had previously been police officers and the fourth had worked in private industry. They were head and shoulders above their colleagues in almost every respect and were beacons of excellence in a fog of mediocrity. My point is that my child's teachers are all 'career teachers' who have done nothing else, and that my child is paying the price for their lack of worldliness, and that its not a price that our children should have to pay, and it's not something we should reward the teaching profession for. allthedecentnameshavegone
  • Score: 7

8:05am Fri 28 Mar 14

politepanda says...

""My point is that my child's teachers are all 'career teachers' who have done nothing else, and that my child is paying the price for their lack of worldliness, and that its not a price that our children should have to pay, and it's not something we should reward the teaching profession for.""
Is that because older, more "wordly" people have more sense than to involve themselves in a profession which is more about control via govt. "tick-boxes" and tying teachers hands - so they have no more control over the education they provide than the pupils they teach? It's only the young or the very brave who'd be interested in the teaching profession in 2014.
""My point is that my child's teachers are all 'career teachers' who have done nothing else, and that my child is paying the price for their lack of worldliness, and that its not a price that our children should have to pay, and it's not something we should reward the teaching profession for."" Is that because older, more "wordly" people have more sense than to involve themselves in a profession which is more about control via govt. "tick-boxes" and tying teachers hands - so they have no more control over the education they provide than the pupils they teach? It's only the young or the very brave who'd be interested in the teaching profession in 2014. politepanda
  • Score: 7

9:20am Fri 28 Mar 14

kimcrawley says...

allthe decent../polite panda
I agree with both of you, each of you has recognised the problems we face I was fortunate to be taught by career teachers, however they were people who had experience of the austerity of post war years. These teachers were respected professionals who saw teaching as a vocation, that enabled children to develop in a positive way as rounded people. Successive governments have undermined their professional judgement and imposed rigid restrictions on teachers - preventing them from using their training and professional knowledge.
One of the main causes of this is down to politicians without any teaching qualifications or training imposing their ideological slant on education. The last 20 years have been dominated by politicians with an Oxbridge PPE. They too have gone straight from college to work as researchers/advisors until they gain a safe seat as an MP. They are clever people but with all their paid for top quality public school/Oxbridge education they have still managed to run the economy into the ground. Perhaps we should insist that the public schoolboys who run this country should have experience of living in social housing, earning minimum wages.
allthe decent../polite panda I agree with both of you, each of you has recognised the problems we face I was fortunate to be taught by career teachers, however they were people who had experience of the austerity of post war years. These teachers were respected professionals who saw teaching as a vocation, that enabled children to develop in a positive way as rounded people. Successive governments have undermined their professional judgement and imposed rigid restrictions on teachers - preventing them from using their training and professional knowledge. One of the main causes of this is down to politicians without any teaching qualifications or training imposing their ideological slant on education. The last 20 years have been dominated by politicians with an Oxbridge PPE. They too have gone straight from college to work as researchers/advisors until they gain a safe seat as an MP. They are clever people but with all their paid for top quality public school/Oxbridge education they have still managed to run the economy into the ground. Perhaps we should insist that the public schoolboys who run this country should have experience of living in social housing, earning minimum wages. kimcrawley
  • Score: 5

11:41am Fri 28 Mar 14

allthedecentnameshavegone says...

politepanda wrote:
""My point is that my child's teachers are all 'career teachers' who have done nothing else, and that my child is paying the price for their lack of worldliness, and that its not a price that our children should have to pay, and it's not something we should reward the teaching profession for.""
Is that because older, more "wordly" people have more sense than to involve themselves in a profession which is more about control via govt. "tick-boxes" and tying teachers hands - so they have no more control over the education they provide than the pupils they teach? It's only the young or the very brave who'd be interested in the teaching profession in 2014.
Politepanda, you have highlighted an interesting point - a move into teaching is not often an atrtractive proposition for those older, more worldly people who already have sucessful careers, but who could potenttially make great teachers.

Part of the reason may be that the teaching system is too rigid and tick-box focussed, although remember that the comparatively few teachers who manage to be excellent do so within the same framework and system that seems to breed mediocrity in greater quantities. The education system is broken in many ways though and would benefit from a knowledgable and carefully considered, rather than a populist politician driven, overhaul. With the UK slipping further and faster down the education tables there are no shortage of more sucessful examples to draw on from other countries.

Another part of the problem is that for many people, a move into teaching from another career is likely to involve a decrease in earnings. The question is therefore how do you payy enough to tempt successful professionals to leave their jobs and start teaching without over-rewarding the many career teachers whose performance cannot justify a substantial increase inpay?
[quote][p][bold]politepanda[/bold] wrote: ""My point is that my child's teachers are all 'career teachers' who have done nothing else, and that my child is paying the price for their lack of worldliness, and that its not a price that our children should have to pay, and it's not something we should reward the teaching profession for."" Is that because older, more "wordly" people have more sense than to involve themselves in a profession which is more about control via govt. "tick-boxes" and tying teachers hands - so they have no more control over the education they provide than the pupils they teach? It's only the young or the very brave who'd be interested in the teaching profession in 2014.[/p][/quote]Politepanda, you have highlighted an interesting point - a move into teaching is not often an atrtractive proposition for those older, more worldly people who already have sucessful careers, but who could potenttially make great teachers. Part of the reason may be that the teaching system is too rigid and tick-box focussed, although remember that the comparatively few teachers who manage to be excellent do so within the same framework and system that seems to breed mediocrity in greater quantities. The education system is broken in many ways though and would benefit from a knowledgable and carefully considered, rather than a populist politician driven, overhaul. With the UK slipping further and faster down the education tables there are no shortage of more sucessful examples to draw on from other countries. Another part of the problem is that for many people, a move into teaching from another career is likely to involve a decrease in earnings. The question is therefore how do you payy enough to tempt successful professionals to leave their jobs and start teaching without over-rewarding the many career teachers whose performance cannot justify a substantial increase inpay? allthedecentnameshavegone
  • Score: 5

11:50am Fri 28 Mar 14

allthedecentnameshavegone says...

kimcrawley wrote:
allthe decent../polite panda
I agree with both of you, each of you has recognised the problems we face I was fortunate to be taught by career teachers, however they were people who had experience of the austerity of post war years. These teachers were respected professionals who saw teaching as a vocation, that enabled children to develop in a positive way as rounded people. Successive governments have undermined their professional judgement and imposed rigid restrictions on teachers - preventing them from using their training and professional knowledge.
One of the main causes of this is down to politicians without any teaching qualifications or training imposing their ideological slant on education. The last 20 years have been dominated by politicians with an Oxbridge PPE. They too have gone straight from college to work as researchers/advisors until they gain a safe seat as an MP. They are clever people but with all their paid for top quality public school/Oxbridge education they have still managed to run the economy into the ground. Perhaps we should insist that the public schoolboys who run this country should have experience of living in social housing, earning minimum wages.
Kim, you make an excellent point about career politicians. In my view these are a particularly dangerous group of people who have a level of power and influence that is massively disproportionate to their experience. They often, in my view at least, have the added complication that their desparation to attain power makes them wholly unsuitable wield it responsibly.
[quote][p][bold]kimcrawley[/bold] wrote: allthe decent../polite panda I agree with both of you, each of you has recognised the problems we face I was fortunate to be taught by career teachers, however they were people who had experience of the austerity of post war years. These teachers were respected professionals who saw teaching as a vocation, that enabled children to develop in a positive way as rounded people. Successive governments have undermined their professional judgement and imposed rigid restrictions on teachers - preventing them from using their training and professional knowledge. One of the main causes of this is down to politicians without any teaching qualifications or training imposing their ideological slant on education. The last 20 years have been dominated by politicians with an Oxbridge PPE. They too have gone straight from college to work as researchers/advisors until they gain a safe seat as an MP. They are clever people but with all their paid for top quality public school/Oxbridge education they have still managed to run the economy into the ground. Perhaps we should insist that the public schoolboys who run this country should have experience of living in social housing, earning minimum wages.[/p][/quote]Kim, you make an excellent point about career politicians. In my view these are a particularly dangerous group of people who have a level of power and influence that is massively disproportionate to their experience. They often, in my view at least, have the added complication that their desparation to attain power makes them wholly unsuitable wield it responsibly. allthedecentnameshavegone
  • Score: 8

7:10pm Sun 30 Mar 14

glm737 says...

moonraker77 wrote:
glm737 wrote:
Don't like it get a job in the real world. I stand by the comments 100%, it's all about money. Teachers(?) don't give a **** about pupils and resort to the outdated 70's scenario of striking so that they can line their own pockets.
Don't you just love it when there's someone who can't see both sides of a discussion and has to resort to senseless clichés and bad language. Also note that you have time to spare during the working day to vent your frustrations online. Your job if you have one, might bore me.
It's called "shift work". If you are a teacher, you would have no idea what that kind of work is.
[quote][p][bold]moonraker77[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]glm737[/bold] wrote: Don't like it get a job in the real world. I stand by the comments 100%, it's all about money. Teachers(?) don't give a **** about pupils and resort to the outdated 70's scenario of striking so that they can line their own pockets.[/p][/quote]Don't you just love it when there's someone who can't see both sides of a discussion and has to resort to senseless clichés and bad language. Also note that you have time to spare during the working day to vent your frustrations online. Your job if you have one, might bore me.[/p][/quote]It's called "shift work". If you are a teacher, you would have no idea what that kind of work is. glm737
  • Score: 4

11:18pm Sun 30 Mar 14

kimcrawley says...

moonraker77
Without teachers we would all have to join the race to the bottom and become 'shift workers' - unlike teachers who undertake thousands oh hours of unpaid work each year. How do you fancy working for nothing and facing criticism from people unable to string together a better argument than teachers do not know what work is. Do you feel the same way about the royal family surely they need to get a proper job.
moonraker77 Without teachers we would all have to join the race to the bottom and become 'shift workers' - unlike teachers who undertake thousands oh hours of unpaid work each year. How do you fancy working for nothing and facing criticism from people unable to string together a better argument than teachers do not know what work is. Do you feel the same way about the royal family surely they need to get a proper job. kimcrawley
  • Score: -3

6:48pm Mon 31 Mar 14

allthedecentnameshavegone says...

kimcrawley wrote:
moonraker77
Without teachers we would all have to join the race to the bottom and become 'shift workers' - unlike teachers who undertake thousands oh hours of unpaid work each year. How do you fancy working for nothing and facing criticism from people unable to string together a better argument than teachers do not know what work is. Do you feel the same way about the royal family surely they need to get a proper job.
Kim, I think that many of our nurses and A&E doctors might disagree that shift working is a 'race to the bottom'.

I couldn't agree more though that the royal family need to get proper jobs - best suggestion of this thread so far!
[quote][p][bold]kimcrawley[/bold] wrote: moonraker77 Without teachers we would all have to join the race to the bottom and become 'shift workers' - unlike teachers who undertake thousands oh hours of unpaid work each year. How do you fancy working for nothing and facing criticism from people unable to string together a better argument than teachers do not know what work is. Do you feel the same way about the royal family surely they need to get a proper job.[/p][/quote]Kim, I think that many of our nurses and A&E doctors might disagree that shift working is a 'race to the bottom'. I couldn't agree more though that the royal family need to get proper jobs - best suggestion of this thread so far! allthedecentnameshavegone
  • Score: 5

9:07pm Mon 31 Mar 14

WR950 says...

The teachers have my full support. Good on them to not be bullied by this government and that unbearable man, Gove.
The teachers have my full support. Good on them to not be bullied by this government and that unbearable man, Gove. WR950
  • Score: -1

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