Near silent fan by Dyson 'quieter than a mosquito'

Sir James Dyson with an Air Multiplier fan

Sir James Dyson with an Air Multiplier fan

First published in News
Last updated

Dyson is releasing a "near silent" update to its bladeless fan that it claims is quieter than a buzzing mosquito.

The company, which has its headquarters at Malmesbury, says its new Air Multiplier fan is up to 75 per cent quieter than the original model, released in 2009, after a team of 65 Dyson engineers reduced the turbulence of high velocity air.

The fan is the first Dyson machine to include a Helmholtz cavity in the base to eliminate tones of 1,000Hz, similar to the frequency of the noise produced by the wing beat of mosquitoes.

Dyson's engineers found that the frequency that most irritated users of its previous fans was 1,000Hz, making their goal for it to be "totally inaudible" from the new model.

A Helmholtz cavity catches sound waves travelling through the machine. When air is forced into the Helmholtz, the pressure inside increases.

These sound waves are then bounced within the cavity, dissipating the sound and in turn improving the tone of the machine.

Engineers developing the new model passed UV paint through the machine's loop to chart and optimise airflow, with the aim of reducing noise.

The bladeless fan, which has proved to be one of Dyson's most successful and profitable inventions, works by using a brushless motor in the base to draw air in and feed it into the circular tube.

The air then comes out of a crack all around the ring and passes over a shape like that of an aircraft wing.

Dyson said it invested £40 million into its newest fans, spending almost £1.5m every week on research and development in 2012.

The various sizes of the new fan cost between £220 and £300 and weigh between 7.3lb and 15lb.

Sir James Dyson said: "By reducing air turbulence and using ingenious, simple engineering principles like a Helmholtz cavity, Dyson engineers have targeted tones and reduced sound volume, making quiet fans with powerful airflow."

Dyson, which employs more than 3,600 staff worldwide, was founded in 1992 and now sells machines, including vacuum cleaners and hand dryers, in more than 50 markets.

Comments (1)

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11:08pm Wed 12 Mar 14

Eric_Jones says...

Yes, It's probably very clever.
...
But who in their right mind would pay £300 for a fan?
Cost and time-to-market have been given far too much priority in all walks of life latterly but Value (as opposed to simply "cheap" still has to be a requirement for a product to sell.

Generally though: My hat is off to Mr Dyson for making a success in British Engineering and I am delighted at all the promotion of it that he is bringing to my hometown. I wish there were more people like him that just get out there and suceed while refusing to accept the woebegone tale that Britain is doomed to decline
Yes, It's probably very clever. ... But who in their right mind would pay £300 for a fan? Cost and time-to-market have been given far too much priority in all walks of life latterly but Value (as opposed to simply "cheap" still has to be a requirement for a product to sell. Generally though: My hat is off to Mr Dyson for making a success in British Engineering and I am delighted at all the promotion of it that he is bringing to my hometown. I wish there were more people like him that just get out there and suceed while refusing to accept the woebegone tale that Britain is doomed to decline Eric_Jones
  • Score: 0

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